Arlette Huguenin

Email:
huguenin@gmx.ch

Supervisor:
Prof. Dr. U. Fries

Text Linguistics in Music Magazines and Webzines

When researchers are confronted with the new field of hypertext linguistics, they also face newly coined expressions regarding the research topic. The World Wide Web and its texts are not limited to E-mails, but also include Blogs and webzines among others. My contribution illustrates hypertext linguistics as a new direction in English linguistics and exemplifies its claim with a brief analysis of the internet text type webzine.

The internet offers a wide range of informative journalistic products that compete with their printed predecessors. Print magazines and newspapers have established their additional so-called internet presence and offer their readers informative content in the virtual world as well. Hence, the present situation gives way to the thesis that the new medium significantly alters the shape of journalistic text production and reception by its readers. The question regarding the research method is obvious: Do forms of communication within the World Wide Web require a new analysis procedure?

The new field of hypertext linguistics has so far been treated with German studies, where a significant amount of work dealing with the new digital text types and their production and reception have been published. English linguistics is still lacking research work concerned with text types in the hypertext world of the WWW. Nevertheless, English linguistics can greatly profit from the findings of German hypertext linguists as questions regarding hypertext production and reception are of great interest cross-linguistically. The presentation to be held will thus include an overview of the most recent and relevant research in the field. Furthermore, it will depict possible methodological approaches to tackle text type analysis in this fairly new field. Hypertext linguistics offers researchers an ever growing and vast amount of texts and an up-to-date treasure chest of language change found in written communication.